Food assistance critical for millions

Food assistance critical for millions

Sep 24
Craig Gundersen, Executive Director of the National Soybean Research Laboratory and Soybean Industry Endowed Professor of Agricultural Strategy
  

While food insecurity in America is by no means a new problem, it has been made worse by the Great Recession. And, despite the end of the Great Recession, food insecurity rates remain high. Currently, about 49 million people in the United States are living in food insecure households. In a forthcoming article in Applied Economics Policy and Perspectives, I provided an overview of Map the Meal Gap, a tool that is used to establish food insecurity rates at the local level for Feeding America, the umbrella organization for food banks in the United States.

In this article, myself and co-authors Elaine Waxman and Emily Engelhard, both from Feeding America, describe the methods underlying these estimates, followed by answers to the following: What are the state-level determinants of food insecurity? What is the distribution of food insecurity across counties in the United States? How do the county-level food insecurity estimates generated in Map the Meal Gap compare with other sources?

To go along with this paper, Waxman, Amy Satoh, and myself created a post on the London School of Economics, USAPP– American Politics and Policy Blog. Along with reviewing Map the Meal Gap, we discussed ways that policies can and are being used to reduce food insecurity in the United States.