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Research

For relationship maintenance, accurate perception of partner’s behavior is key

URBANA, Ill. – Married couples and long-term romantic partners typically engage in a variety of behaviors that sustain and nourish the relationship. These actions promote higher levels of commitment, which benefits couples’ physical and psychological health.

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U of I researchers develop organic nanozymes suitable for agricultural use

URBANA, Ill. – Nanozymes are synthetic materials that mimic the properties of natural enzymes for applications in biomedicine and chemical engineering. They are generally considered too toxic and expensive for use in agriculture and food science.

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Management zone maps of little use to corn growers, study finds

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A multiyear analysis tested whether management zone maps based on soil conditions, topography or other landscape features can reliably predict which parts of a cornfield will respond best to higher rates of seeding or nitrogen application. The study found that – contrary to common assumptions – crop-plot responses to the same inputs vary significantly from year to year. The most unpredictable factor – the weather – seemed to have the biggest impact on how the crops responded to these inputs.

The new findings are reported in the Agronomy Journal. 

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Don’t feel appreciated by your partner? Relationship interventions can help

URBANA, Ill. – When we’re married or in a long-term romantic relationship, we may eventually come to take each other for granted and forget to show appreciation.

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New pipeline makes valuable organic acid from plants — saving money and emissions

In a breakthrough for environmentally friendly chemical production, researchers at the Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation (CABBI) have developed an economical way to make succinic acid, an important industrial chemical, from sugarcane.

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Illinois-led team puts cows and microbes to work to reduce greenhouse gases

URBANA, Ill. — As we hurtle toward crucial tipping points on a warming planet, an international team of scientists is recruiting a surprising ally to make a powerful dent in greenhouse gas emissions: the cow.

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How parents’ work stress affects family mealtimes and children’s development

URBANA, Ill. – Family mealtimes are important for parents and children as a space to communicate, socialize, and build attachment relationships. But it can be difficult for busy parents to balance family and work life.

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Researchers propose a unified, scalable framework to measure agricultural greenhouse gas emissions

Illinois natural resources and environmental sciences professor Kaiyu Guan says that there are many farming practices that can go a long way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but the scientific community has struggled to find a consistent method for measuring how well these practices work. His new study presents a comprehensive approach to help the stakeholders within the agricultural industry “speak the same language” when discussing greenhouse gas emissions. 

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Mindfulness programs help minoritized youth develop healthy coping skills, study shows

URBANA, Ill. – Educational programs that promote mental and physical health can help young people – particularly in environments of chronic stress and trauma exposure – learn healthy coping strategies, avoid risky behaviors, and succeed in school.

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ER-positive breast cancer presents differing metabolic signatures in African American, white women

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — New research found the most common form of breast cancer presents differing metabolic signatures in the blood of African American women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer compared with non-Hispanic white women. The scientists also identified a protein – negative elongation factor complex E – that was linked with higher mortality rates among African American women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. 

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