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International

ACES international business course immerses students into Croatia’s booming tourism economy

Known for its beautiful coastlines, mountains, castles, forests, and more, Croatia is a rapidly rising top tourism destination that selected Illinois students analyzed firsthand as part of an experiential learning program focused on recreation and tourism economics of the Mediterranean.

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ACES Global Academy connects with three Brazilian universities

Representatives of the longstanding Global Academy program visited three Brazilian universities this spring to establish and renew connections towards research collaborations and exchange programs.  

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Toward women and youth’s access to postharvest mechanization in Bangladesh

In observance of Earth Day (April 22), we share work being done by Maria Jones, associate director of the ADM Institute for the Prevention of Postharvest Loss, and Samantha Lindgren, assistant professor in the Department of Education and affiliated faculty member in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering and the Technology Entrepreneurship Center in the Grainger College of Engineering.

By Sam Lindgren, Ghaida Alrawashdeh, and Maria Jones

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ACES International announces funding recipients for projects in South Africa, India, and Brazil

Three faculty from the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES) have received funding to further their international work through the longstanding ACES International Seed Grant program.

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Ensuring food security in the tropics through livestock genetic improvement is goal of symposium

Animal scientists, economists, and colleagues from the humanities and other fields met on the University of Illinois campus in April to focus on livestock in the tropics and its role in food security. 

The event marked the Seventh Annual International Food Security Symposium at Illinois facilitated by the Office of International Programs (OIP) in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES).

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Understanding the long-term impact of climate change on Indian crops

Over the past few decades, it has become obvious that climate change, and consequent extreme weather events, can wreak havoc on crop yields. Concerningly, there is a large disparity in agricultural vulnerability between developed and developing countries. In a new study, researchers have looked at major food grains in India to understand the long- and short-term effects of climate change on crop yields.

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ACES undergraduates work towards global food security as part of internship program

Through the innovative Global Food Security Interns program, selected undergraduates in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES) have the opportunity to work with faculty mentors on specific projects towards global food and nutrition security in low- and middle-income countries.

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ACES International announces funding recipients for projects in Vietnam, Brazil, Kenya, and Pakistan

Four faculty from the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES) have received funding to further their international work through the longstanding ACES International Seed Grant program.

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ACES to host U.S.-German Forum on the Future of Agriculture

Selected farmers in the United States Corn Belt will participate in the U.S.-German Forum on the Future of Agriculture, a unique transatlantic dialogue starting in spring 2023.

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Illinois study: Which weather characteristics affect agricultural and food trade the most?

URBANA, Ill. – Changing weather patterns have profound impacts on agricultural production around the world. Higher temperatures, severe drought, and other weather events may decrease output in some regions but effects are often volatile and unpredictable. Yet, many countries rely on agricultural and food trade to help alleviate the consequences of local, weather-induced production shifts, a new paper from the University of Illinois suggests.

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